Using fiction to teach human rights: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning To Kill a Mockingbird is a twentieth century classic. Find out how you can use the novel to teach human rights.

Become an Amnesty teacher and learn about human rights

'This course has given me fantastic resources and more confidence when dealing with human rights issues in the classroom. My students have benefitted from the chance to discuss topics such as women’s rights and LGBTI rights on a deeper level and it has helped me to create a more inclusive classroom’.
Course participant, 2017

Are you a teacher with a passion for human rights, equality and justice? Our Continuing Professional Development (CPD) teacher programme will give you the expertise to engage your students with human rights.

Burn 9: respect

Students look at the subtleties and connotations of language, and the impact words have in describing a person or event.

Burn 9: respect

Burn 7: speak up

Students explore how words can help process feelings of anger and helplessness – and bring about self-empowerment.

Burn 7: speak up

Burn 5: witness

On film, poet Emtithal Mahmoud asks students to ‘bear witness’ to her experiences of genocide in Darfur.

Burn 5: witness

Burn 4: change

Students learn that everyone has a role to play in upholding human rights – in their school, community and world.

Burn 4: change
Posted 27 Oct 2017, 5:14pm
2 comments

Videos for Sessions

Hi Everyone,

Here is a google sheet I have put together with a list of videos I have found and used in sessions. Feel free to add more!

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1IyO7h-mjQcHps4bL2tkDB07IbgYnpZV7uCkg4dUakt0/edit?usp=sharing

Thanks

Alex

Burn 10: words that burn

Students are challenged to Make A Difference in a Minute by standing up for human rights through poetry.

Burn 10: make a difference

Burn 8: power

Students explore poems about race and privilege before creating their own protest poetry.

Burn 8: power
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