Uganda's anti-gay laws: we need your help to spread the word

If you’re gay and live in Africa, this hasn’t been a good couple of weeks. Both Nigeria and Uganda, instead of setting an example with their laws (such as South Africa in the 90s), are going backwards towards state-sanctioned homophobia.

In Uganda, where the President could still veto the Anti-Homosexuality Bill, we’ve a small window to urge him to do the right thing. And you’ve joined us in your thousands in just a few days. Thank you.

As the end of his 30-day window to veto gets closer we need to get louder, not quieter.

Today we’ve launched an SMS petition to try and get even more signatures. We’ll send a fax to President Museveni’s office co-signed by everyone who texts, and we want it to be huge.

Help us spread the word: put up our posters (or make your own!)

15,000 of you have sent an email to President Museveni in just one week. Now we need you to go one step further – print out one of our posters to encourage your school friends, work colleagues and neighbours to add their voice.
You could display our posters in your car window, on the work fridge, or school noticeboards. Just make sure it’s visible and encourage everyone you know to take action.

Win a ‘Call Me Kuchu’ DVD, the award-winning documentary on LGBT life in Uganda

The UK distributors of ‘Call Me Kuchu’ (read all about it here) have generously sent us some DVDs of their documentary on Uganda’s LGBT activists to help us encourage more people to take action.

To be in with a chance to win one, send us a photo of where you’re displaying your posters

  • Tweet us a photo of your posters with the text “Urge Uganda to veto homophobic law #LGBTUganda”
  • Or upload your photo to our Facebook  page: www.facebook.com/amnestyUK

You can use our posters, or make your own (see these from a previous Urgent Action for inspiration)

And if you haven’t yet, take action yourself. Send an email to President Museveni, or text VETO3 to 70505 to add your name to our mass-fax.

About Amnesty UK Blogs
Our blogs are written by Amnesty International staff, volunteers and other interested individuals, to encourage debate around human rights issues. They do not necessarily represent the views of Amnesty International.
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