This could be Raif’s chance – ask for his freedom

Today is day 1,147. Raif Badawi has been detained in Saudi Arabia for over three years now – and all for blogging, for encouraging debate, and exercising his right to free speech.

His sentence upheld last month, Raif continues to serve out a decade in prison, awaiting 950 more lashes in public and a decade-long ban on travel once he’s released – as well as a hefty fine. Today, Raif will be in his cell knowing that he may once again face 50 lashes tomorrow, the final Friday of Ramadan. But there is hope.

Saudi Arabia’s head of state, King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, can set him free. We know that the end of the holy month of Ramadan is traditionally a time when some prisoners are released, and would like to you to help us call on the King to use this occasion to release Raif and all other prisoners of conscience in the country. Find out how

It would be amazing news for his wife, Ensaf, and his children to know that their long and painful separation would be over. She has campaigned long and hard for her husband’s release.

Recently she told us 'I have pleaded and would like to reiterate my plea to His Majesty King Salman, Saudi Arabia’s ruler, to pardon Raif and stop his flogging. It is true that I have received no reply but I remain optimistic and will continue pleading until the last moment.'

Please continue to stand alongside Ensaf and ask the King to release Raif now.

Ask King Salman to release Raif and all prisoners of conscience in Saudi Arabia

Tweet the King

Tweet now: Please release @raif_badawi & grant him justice, @KingSalman. He has been imprisoned for 3 years too long & must be freed.

Tweet King Salman

Post on Facebook

Comment on recent post on Saudi Arabia's Ministry of Foreign Affairs Facebook page (you cannot write directly on the wall of the page).

Feel free to write your own message, or copy and paste the following comment:

Please free Raif Badawi and all prisoners of conscience in Saudi Arabia. Respect human rights and release them.

About Amnesty UK Blogs
Our blogs are written by Amnesty International staff, volunteers and other interested individuals, to encourage debate around human rights issues. They do not necessarily represent the views of Amnesty International.
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