Press Release: Scotland must 'show its workings' on International Relations and human rights

Human Rights Defenders protesting

The Scottish Government must do more to show how the human rights records of states are considered in its international activity, Amnesty International has warned.

Following the publication of the Scottish Government’s International Strategy, Amnesty has written to External Affairs Secretary Angus Robertson calling for increased transparency around how human rights are considered by Ministers and officials in their dealings with foreign governments. 

Liz Thomson, Amnesty’s Scotland Advocacy Manager said:

“Whether and how human rights concerns are addressed in bilateral meetings, or taken into account when entering into agreements such as the recent deal with the United Arab Emirates - a government with a jaw-dropping contempt for human rights – must be much clearer. Only then can Ministers’ actions be measured against their claims to promote human rights on the world stage. 

“The Scottish Government has made welcome commitments to embedding human rights in its international policy, but must do more to show its workings on how the rights records of states actually affect decision making.  

“We know Scotland has at times been a force for good internationally, but there needs to be a more consistent and transparent approach on human rights, especially as Ministers’ ambitions to work in the global arena increase. 

“We have written to the Cabinet Secretary calling on the Scottish Government to enhance transparency and accountability around these activities in a way that allows proper scrutiny from Parliament and the public.”

Downloads
Letter to Cabinet Secretary Angus Robertson Jan 2024.pdf
AIUK HRD Protection briefing 2023.pdf
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