Please raise the following questions in meeting during Xi Jinping’s UK visit

1.    How have you (Xi Jinping) occupied the top position in China?

 

The Chinese Communist Party has used violence to seize political power and hold monopoly on power for 66 years. P. R. China has no electoral mandate based on International bill of Human Rights (especially Article 21 of Universal Declaration of Human Rights Article 25 of International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights), thereby it has no authority or credibility to represent peoples under its rule and China as a member of the United Nations.

 

2.    How did you torture and kill Cao Shunli?

 

Cao Shunli (曹顺利) was detained several times after advocating for civil society participation in the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) in late 2008. Originally detained in September 2013 at Beijing airport while on her way to Geneva for observation of for the UPR of the State of China, Cao was held in a detention centre where her health seriously deteriorated. The requests of her family and her lawyer Wang Yu for medical release were repeatedly denied, and she developed a number of serious illnesses, including tuberculosis. Cao was taken to an intensive-care unit of a Beijing military hospital on 16 February 2014 where she died a month later. The Chinese authorities’ role in disappearing, arbitrarily detaining, torturing and denying Cao Shunli medical treatment in detention, directly led to her death.  In 2014, Tibetan prisoners Goshul Lobsang (果秀洛桑), Kunchok Drakpa, and Tenzin Choedak (丹增曲扎) died in March, April and December, respectively, after their bodies were decimated by torture; they had been serving long sentences tied to the demonstrations in the Tibet Autonomous Region in 2008. Shi Enxiang (師恩祥), an underground bishop died in custody after 14 Years secret detention. In 2015, two Tibetan prisoners of conscience including Tibetan senior Monk Tenzin Delek Rinpoche and Lobsang Yeshi died in custody.

 

3.    What role did you and your wife play during the Tiananmen Massacre (Beijing Massacre) 26 years ago? Who joined in martial law troops in 1989 and are current members of the army? How many people were killed in Beijing and other places in June 1989? How many people were arrested during the Crackdown? How many people died in jail? How many people have now remained in jail or psychosocial facilities? Why does the Chinese authority not allow the commemoration of Beijing Massacre victims in public? How does Chinese authority reply to Tiananmen Mothers’ demands after Jiang Peikun, one of founding Tiananmen Mothers, died in this month?

 

Xi Jinping worked as a secretary in Central Military Commission of Chinese Communist Party in the 1980s. Peng Liyuan, his wife, Peng Liyuan sang to the troops following the 1989 massacre in Beijing.

 

Tiananmen Mothers: http://www.hrichina.org/en/content/6578

 

4.    Why do you detain Gao Yu in spite of her serious health condition? Are you murdering Gao Yu? How many journalists and bloggers have been jailed from 2013 to present?

Gao Yu (高瑜), 71, journalist, was sentenced to seven years in prison on the charge of ‘leaking state secrets’. This is Gao's third time in prison. In June 2015, her lawyers reported that she is suffering from regular and severe heart pains, but has only received traditional Chinese medicine, and that she has a worsening chronic skin allergy. She continues to receive daily medication for high blood pressure. In July, she reportedly told her son that her left arm was numb. The detention centre hospital diagnosed her as suffering from tenosynovitis, a tendon inflammation, and gave her painkillers and an anti-inflammatory drug. After a lawyers’ visit on July 28, Gao Yu said she had recently been sent for a hospital check-up. Doctors found blockages in her arteries and a lump in her lymph node but will not know if it is cancerous unless she has further tests. Her lawyers cannot apply for release on medical parole until after her appeal, which is pending. However, according to her lawyers, authorities are pressuring her to confess her guilt on television in order to be released. She was also told to dismiss her lawyers Shang Baojun and Mo Shaoping but refused. At the beginning of October she had a heart attack and was in a great deal of pain and called the doctor, who carried out emergency treatment to save her.  Citizen journalists and bloggers were more often targeted when they tried to hold the government to account on politically sensitive issues. After a lawyers’ visit on July 28, Gao Yu said she had recently been sent for a hospital check-up. Doctors found blockages in her arteries and a lump in her lymph node but won’t know if it is cancerous unless she has further tests. Her lawyers cannot apply for release on medical parole until after her appeal, which is pending. However, according to her lawyers, authorities are pressuring her to confess her guilt on television in order to be released. She was also told to dismiss her lawyers Shang and Mo Shaoping (莫少平) but refused. In this month,

 

In recent two past years, Chinese authorities have detained journalists and bloggers more than anywhere else in world.

 

5.    Where is Bao Zhuoxuan? Where is Wang Yu? When will Bao Zhuoxuan be free?

Bao Zhuoxuan, the son of the detained human rights lawyer Wang Yu. Mr. Bao was taken by uniformed men this month from a guesthouse in Mong La, a town in Myanmar near the Chinese border. In the early hours of July 9, 2015, authorities abducted prominent human rights lawyer Wang Yu from her residence in Beijing after they apparently had cut the power in her home. Wang had returned home that morning after taking her husband, Bao Longjun (包龙军), and teenage son, Bao Zhuoxuan (包卓轩), to the Beijing airport. She sent out alerts through her phone about unidentified people trying to break the lock on her apartment around 4 a.m., and has since been out of contact. According to neighbors, guards told them the heavy police presence was a raid on drug dealers and that one person was detained. Both Wang’s husband and son were prevented from boarding their plane and taken away. Bao Zhuoxuan was later handed over to his aunt, while his parents remain in criminal detention without police confirmation of criminal charges or their whereabouts. Wang’s son continued to be summoned and harassed by police while being barred from traveling and threatened not to speak to others. The day after Wang Yu was taken away, around 300 lawyers and activists were detained, interrogated and harassed.

 

6.    How many people from 2013 to present were jailed on spurious charges such as "terrorism”,  "separatism", "subversion of state power", "evil cult", "creating a disturbance",“leaked state secrets”, "protecting and harbouring the criminal”,“creating a public disturbance” ",  illegal business operation”?

7.    How many people from 2013 to present are sent to psychosocial facilities by police?

 

More questions refer to the list below 

 

Partial list of Prisoners of Conscience in Tibet East Turkestan and China

 

 

 

 

Cao Shunli (曹顺利) was detained several times after advocating for civil society participation in the UPR in late 2008. Originally detained in September 2013 at Beijing airport while on her way to Geneva, Cao was held in a detention centre where her health seriously deteriorated. Her family’s requests for medical release were repeatedly denied, and she developed a number of serious illnesses, including tuberculosis. Cao was taken to an intensive-care unit of a Beijing military hospital on 16 February 2014 where she died a month later. The Chinese authorities’ role in disappearing, arbitrarily detaining, torturing and denying Cao Shunli medical treatment in detention, directly led to her death. Her body has still not been returned to her family.

 

Chen Yunfei (陈云飞), a human rights activist and blogger from Sichuan province who has campaigned against environmental degradation, highlighted human rights abuses and spoken out on behalf of the families seeking justice for those killed in the aftermath of the Tiananmen Square protests in 1989. He has been subjected to threats, harassment, physical attack, illegal detention and house arrest as a result of his work. On 6 April 2015, the family of human rights defender Mr Chen Yunfei received formal notification from the authorities in Sichuan province that the defender has been charged with 'picking quarrels and provoking troubles' and 'inciting subversion of state power'. He is currently detained in Xinjin County Detention Centre in Sichuan Province, where he has not yet been permitted access to a lawyer. Dozens of Participants in Tiananmen Protests 26 Years Ago Incarcerated After Continuing Advocacy for Human Rights, https://chrdnet.com/2015/06/chrb-end-persecution-of-participants-in-1989-pro-democracy-movement-for-their-ongoing-activism/

 

Chen Xi (陈西) – Chronic enteritis, Date of Birth: February 28, 1954, Place of Detention: Xingyi Prison, Guizhou Province, Chen Xi, a member of the Guizhou Human Rights Forum, has been serving a 10-year sentence on the charge of “inciting subversion of state power” since January 2012. Chen’s wife Zhang Qunxuan (张群选) is extremely concerned about the health of her husband, and fears he may die if not given proper medical treatment. For over a year, Chen has been suffering from chronic enteritis, an inflammation or infection of the digestive tract that causes severe diarrhea, dehydration, and fever. Zhang first learned Chen was suffering from a stomach ailment after a visit in January 21, 2014, when he told her he had been having bouts of diarrhea since early December 2013 but had not received effective treatment. After a visit in May 2014, Zhang reported that her husband’s health had not improved; she found that he is very weak and thin, and that his mental state is very poor. Following a December 26, 2014 visit, Zhang reported that Chen’s condition had worsened; he is extremely weak and has lost a lot of weight. She believes he now weighs approximately 120 pounds (55 kilos). The prison has given him some medication but they have had no effect. Authorities rejected Chen Xi’s lawyer’s application for medical parole made after the May visit. His wife filed a new application for release following the December visit but has not received a response.

 

 

Gao Yu (高瑜), 71, women journalist, was sentenced to seven years in prison on spurious charge “ leaking state secrets” which an internal Communist party document which urged the aggressive targeting of subversive ideological trends including support for western democratic ideals, media independence, civil society and the “universal values” of human rights. This is Gao's third time in prison. Gao, working for the official China News Service in 1980s, mostly produced interviews with various famous personalities and provided her articles including student movements in 1988 to oversea Chinese language media in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and other countries. In 1988, Gao joined the Economics Weekly which was taken over by the Democracy Wall  veterans Chen Ziming. She published a few influencial interviews, including one with Yan Jiaqi and Wen Yuankai on political reform. During the 1989 Pro-democracy Movement, Gao Yu joined her fellow journalists in a few protest marches. After the martial law, on May 21, Gao Yu contacted two dozens representatives in the National People's Congress, demanding a them to revoke the martial law. On June 3, just before the bloody crackdown, Gao Yu was kidnapped in front of her home and then was secretly jailed for 15 months. Gao Yu remained active after her release. In 1993, she was arrested again for "leaking state secret" and sentenced to six years in prison. In June 2015, her lawyers reported that she is suffering from regular and severe heart pains, but has only received traditional Chinese medicine, and that she has a worsening chronic skin allergy. She continues to receive daily medication for high blood pressure. In July, she reportedly told her son that her left arm was numb. The detention center hospital diagnosed her as suffering from tenosynovitis, a tendon inflammation, and gave her painkillers and an anti-inflammatory drug. After a lawyers’ visit on July 28, Gao Yu said she had recently been sent for a hospital check-up. Doctors found blockages in her arteries and a lump in her lymph node but won’t know if it is cancerous unless she has further tests. Her lawyers cannot apply for release on medical parole until after her appeal, which is pending. However, according to her lawyers, authorities are pressuring her to confess her guilt on television in order to be released. She was also told to dismiss her lawyers Shang and Mo Shaoping (莫少平) but refused. In early October, She had emergency treatment for her heart pain,

 

Gao Yue (高月). Date of birth: 27th September 1987. Project assistant to Lawyer Li Heping. Gao Yue was detained around the 20th July 2015 and her family have been informed that she has been placed under ‘residential surveillance in a designated location’, likely in Tianjin. She was originally accused of the offence of ‘picking quarrels and stirring up trouble’, but this has subsequently been revised to suspicion of state subversion. Her lawyers, Li Guobei and Wang Fei, have consistently been denied access to her and have been refused any further information on her case.

 

Guo Feixiong (郭飞雄 aka Yang Maodong 杨茂东)– Unknown, effects of hunger strike/torture, Date of Birth: August 2, 1966, Place of Detention: Guangzhou Tianhe District Detention Center, Guangdong Province. Guo Feixiong is the pen name of Yang Maodong, a prominent Guangzhou writer and lawyer. He was seized by Guangzhou police on August 8, 2013, and arrested on September 11 on a charge of “gathering a crowd to disrupt order of a public place.” According to his lawyer, Guo’s health has deteriorated while in detention, and his lower legs are extremely weak. His sister and doctor believe his condition could be caused from the hunger strike he went on in protest of his treatment, or from torture. His lawyer has applied twice for release on medical bail, the first time in 2013 and then again in June 2014, but authorities refused to grant bail, claiming that Guo posed a “danger to society” if released. According to his wife Zhang Qing (张青), he was relatively healthy before he was detained. Guo was previously imprisoned from 2006-2011, during which he was severely tortured, including being beaten, tied to a tiger bench* and was hanged from a ceiling by his arms with his legs bent back while being hit with an electric prod on the face, arms, and genitals.

Hada (哈达) – Depression, unknown kidney condition, coronary heart disease, stomach ulcer, rheumatoid arthritis Date of birth: November 29, 1955, Place of detention: black jail in Jin Ye Ecological Technical Gardens, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region (released) Hada, a Mongolian scholar and activist, served a 15-year sentence for “splittism” and “espionage” that ended on December 10, 2010. However, authorities continued to detain him in an illegal “black jail” until December 9, 2014. Authorities had also seized his wife Xinna (新娜) and son Uiles (威勒斯) on trumped-up charges of “illegal business activity” and “illegal drug possession,” respectively. After 16 months in detention, Xinna was sentenced to 3 years in prison in 2012 but released days later. Both she and Uiles are under “residential surveillance.” Hada has heart disease, a serious stomach ulcer, rheumatoid arthritis, an unknown kidney condition, and depression. He suffered years of torture and mistreatment while in Chifeng Prison in Inner Mongolia, and was denied proper medical care. Under his current form of arbitrary detention, his family reported that guards are exploiting his loneliness and depression, and it is unclear if he is receiving adequate medical treatment for his other conditions. Upon his release in December, Hada and Xinna gave a series of interviews to the Southern Mongolian Human Rights Information Center. In March 2014, his wife Xinna described him as being in “poor health.” He is being held in a single room and his depression has reportedly worsened. Xinna also reported that the guards have been giving him large quantities of alcohol, apparently in an attempt to cause further mental instability. This situation was first reported in January 2012 after a visit by his mother-in-law. Hada’s uncle Haschuluu reported after a brief visit in April 2012 that Hada had an unknown kidney condition, which was causing frequent urination. It was reported in October 2012 that Hada’s depression was very severe, with a doctor suggesting he be transferred to a psychiatric hospital, but authorities did not allow it. While in Chifeng Prison from 1996-2010, Hada was subjected to a wide range of mistreatment and torture; he was held in solitary confinement, handcuffed overnight to a metal board with shackles, prohibited from talking to others, given only limited contact with his family, forced to work over 10 hours of hard labor every day, beaten by other inmates on orders from prison guards, and forced to eat inedible food, causing him to vomit frequently. Xinna also suffers from a heart condition. When she was arrested in 2010, she reported her condition worsened and authorities denied her a visit to a doctor, but gave her medication that she could not identify. After she was released in 2012, she was finally allowed to see a doctor. She still has chest pains and takes medication.

Hu Shigen (胡石根), former lecturer Veteran pro-democracy and labour activist, jailed for 17 years, taken away on July 10. Hu and Liu Shuiping belonged to the same underground Christian church in Beijing, and were seized on the same day. Activist Gou Hongguo, currently held under residential survelliance, also belongs to the same church. http://www.englishpen.org/campaigns/hu-shigen/

Ilham Tohti (伊力哈木Ÿ.土赫提) – Unknown liver condition, heart disease, pharyngitis, prostatitis Date of Birth: October 25, 1969 Place of Detention: Xinjiang Autonomous Region Public Security Bureau Detention Center, Urumqi City, Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. Ilham Tohti, a Uyghur scholar at the Central University for Nationalities, was seized by Beijing police on January 15, 2014 and arrested on February 20 on charges of “splittism” by Urumqi police. He was tried on September 17-18, and on September 23 authorities sentenced him to life imprisonment and seized all of his assets. According to Tohti’s lawyer Li Fangping (李方平), who along with lawyer Wang Yu (王宇) was allowed a visit on June 26, Tohti suffers from a number of medical conditions and has been mistreated in detention. He has liver pain, possibly caused by an unknown liver condition but no tests have been conducted, as well as heart disease, pharyngitis (an inflammation of the pharynx) and prostatitis (infection of the prostate). He told his lawyer he has been give some medication, but the conditions have not been effectively treated. Since being taken into detention, Tohti has had his legs shackled for 20 days, and from March 1-10, after the attack on the Kunming Train Station which the government blamed on Uyghur separatists, he was deprived of food and given just half a liter of water for 10-days. He also went on a hunger strike for 10-days from January 16-26 to protest against the detention center not providing halal food. Since his detention began, he has lost 16 kilos (35 pounds). His lawyers submitted a complaint to the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region Procuratorate on June 27, 2014, but no investigation was conducted.

 

Karma Tsewang (堪布尕玛才旺) – Hepatitis, Bacterial tracheitis, tuberculosis Date of Birth: unknown (age 38 at time of detention)
Place of Detention: Chamdo Public Security Bureau Detention Center, Tibet Autonomous Region. Karma Tsewang, also known as Khenpo Kartse, is a senior monk from the Yulshul (CH: Yushu) Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in Qinghai Province, has been serving a 30 month prison sentence since he was sentenced in secret in the summer of 2014. Karma Tsewang suffers from hepatitis, bacterial tracheitis, tuberculosis, and other diseases that require medical care and attention, but he has been denied treatment and necessary medication. After entering detention, he began suffering from severe back pain and began ejecting bloody sputum. Due to Karma Tsewang’s numerous medical conditions, his lawyer applied for release on bail after a visit on February 26, 2014, but authorities turned down the request, claiming that the case relates to “state stability.” Subjected to other inhumane punishment, Karma Tsewang reportedly is being held in a cell that does not receive sunlight, eats only one meal a day, and is not allowed to bathe.

 

Li Heping (李和平). Lawyer. Date of birth 26th October 1970. Tianjin police came to Li Heping’s residence in Beijing on 10th July 2015 and took him away. Since then neither his lawyers, Cai Ying and Ma Lianshun, nor his wife have been able to obtain any information on his whereabouts or the reason for his detention. All access to his lawyers has been denied. Li Heping is a prominent human rights lawyer who has recently been working on a number of cases of alleged miscarriages of justice and the use of torture.

 

Liu Jiacai (刘家财) – Heart disease, Date of Birth: October 26, 1965, Place of Detention: Yichang City No. 1 Detention Center, Hubei Province. Liu Jiacai, a Hubei activist, was taken into custody on August 3, 2013, during the crackdown on peaceful assembly, association and expression. He served a 10-day administrative detention on a “disrupting public order” charge before being criminally detained on suspicion of “inciting subversion of state power.” Prior to his detention, Liu had posted and shared views online about legal rights and organized gatherings for activists to discuss issues of rights and social justice. Liu suffers from heart disease, and his family and lawyer have reported that his health has declined in detention. On September 16, 2013, Liu’s wife, Wang Yulan (王玉兰), applied for his release due to a heart condition, but instead Liu was formally arrested two days later. His lawyer, Xie Yanyi (谢燕益), visited him on September 22, 2013, and reported that Liu’s health was poor. Both Xie and Wang have made multiple requests to have Liu released on medical bail, but they have not received a response from authorities. Lawyer Xie reported after a visit in November that Liu was being held in a room with around 20 other detainees, and he requested the detention authorities transfer Liu to a quieter room for humanitarian reasons, but the request was not granted.

Liu Ping (刘萍) of Jiangxi province attempted to stand as a candidate in the 2011-12 local people’s congress elections. Across the country, over four-dozen independent woman candidates including Liu experienced harassment from the local authorities, including physical and verbal attacks. They were prevented from standing, detained and experienced ill treatment, likely amounting to torture, while they were in detention. The court also refused to file a case to investigate an allegation of torture brought by Liu’s lawyers. Liu Ping is serving a six and a half year sentence for her independent candidacy. Medical record during the detention: Gallstone surgery recovery, severe diarrhea, rheumatoid arthritis, Date of Birth: December 2, 1964, Place of Detention: Xinyu City Detention Center, Jiangxi Province. Liu Ping has been denied medical treatment for severe diarrhea that may have been caused by unsanitary conditions at the detention facility. She was still recovering from surgery for an inflamed gallbladder and gallstones that was performed weeks before she was initially detained in April 2013. Liu also reportedly suffers from rheumatoid arthritis. Liu’s lawyer reported in July 2013 she had become very weak, having lost a great deal of weight while needing to force herself to eat and suffering daily bouts of severe diarrhea. Lawyers requested bail for Liu during her first trial in October 2013, but the trial was suspended. Police beat her in the days after they took her into custody, and she reported being choked and, having her arms twisted painfully. Later, when Liu was interrogated in the detention center, police repeatedly shoved her head against metal bars, trying to strangle her, and twisted her arms, all while she was shackled. During her second trial in December, her lawyer raised the issue of torture, but the court refused to dismiss evidence or a confession that may have been extracted from torture. The court also refused to file a case to investigate the allegation of torture. Liu’s lawyer applied for release on bail in March 2014, but was rejected.

 

Liu Xiaobo (刘晓波) and other imprisoned Charter 08 signatories including Liu Xianbin, Chen Wei, Chen Xi, Zhu Yufu, Pu Zhiqiang, Zhao Changqing, Guo Yushan, Tang Jingling, Wang Qingying, Yuan,Xinting, Jiang Lijun, Zhu Yingdi, Li Bifeng, Wei Qin, Wang Kouma, Zhang Lin. Liu Xia and Tie Liu have been held under house arrest. http://wqw2010.blogspot.com/2014/12/1210-28.html?spref=tw

 

 Liu Xiaobo  刘晓波 is a Beijing-based writer, intellectual, dissident, and human rights activist.. Born December 28, 1955, Liu is a vocal critic of the Chinese government, and for his criticisms he has been repeatedly harassed and incarcerated. In 1989, Liu was jailed for 18 months for participating in the student democracy movement. In 1995, he was illegally detained for eight months in a Beijing suburb for issuing a public petition. In 1996, he was sent to three years of Re-education through Labor (RTL). From 1999 until his detention in 2008, Liu was placed under illegal “soft detention” at home.On December 8, 2008, a day before the issuance of “Charter 08,” a public appeal calling for bold reforms that promote democracy and human rights in China, Liu was taken away from his home by a dozen policemen. He was detained on suspicion of “inciting subversion of state power” for co-authoring and signing the petition as well as organizing others to sign it, with authorities alleging that Liu had incited the overturn of the socialist system through methods such as spreading rumors and slander. On 25 December 2009, Liu Xiaobo was sentenced to 11 years in Jail.

On December 10, 2010, Liu Xiaobo was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Liu was poignantly represented by an empty chair at the ceremony in Oslo. When told of the announcement after October 8, he wept and told his wife, Liu Xia, that it was dedicated to the martyrs of Tiananmen. Liu Xia has been under house arrest since the award announcement and is incommunicado. Liu Xiaobo was formally moved to Jinzhou Prison in Liaoning, his home province, on May 24, 2010. He reportedly now has access to books published in China and is permitted rare visits from his wife. -

on December 8, 2008, before the formal release of Charter 08, police arrived at the Beijing homes of Liu and fellow activist Zhang Zuhua. At 11:00 p.m., they took both men away and searched their homes, confiscating computers and other materials. His arrest occurred during a period of several sensitive anniversaries, including the 100-year anniversary of the promulgation of China’s first constitution, the 60-year anniversary of the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the 30-year anniversary of Beijing’s “Democracy Wall” movement.

Ms. Liu Xia (刘霞) – Unknown heart condition, depression
Date of Birth: April 1, 1961, Place of Detention: Illegal house arrest, Beijing.

Liu Xia, a poet and painter, has been under house arrest in Beijing since October 2010, and has not been charged with any crime. The restriction of her freedom of movement began after her husband Liu Xiaobo (刘晓波) was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She has only been able to go out of her residence in the company of national security officers, visitors are not allowed, and telephone and Internet communications have been shut off.

In early February 2014, police accompanied Liu Xia to a Beijing hospital because of symptoms of heart disease — reportedly diagnosed by doctors as a heart attack—and also a throat inflammation. The hospital stopped tests after just one day and sent her home, according to her lawyer, Mo Shaoping (莫少平). Initially, doctors said she would be admitted for two weeks for comprehensive tests. On February 18, Liu Xia was hospitalized for the second time to undergo tests and treatment for a heart condition. Additionally, Liu Xia has mentioned to her lawyer severe depression brought on by isolation and restrictions, but she did not want to see a psychologist, fearing that authorities may send her to a psychiatric hospital against her will. Police have warned her family not to speak publically about her health, and reportedly have refused to allow Liu to travel overseas for medical treatment.

 

Liu Yuandong (刘远东), another prisoner of conscience in Guangzhou tried without a verdict, has been denied of yard time for 2 and half years, poor health. http://wqw2010.blogspot.com/2015/08/blog-post_614.html?spref=tw

Pu Zhiqiang (浦志强) – Diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, prostatitis. Date of Birth: January 17, 1965, Place of Detention: Beijing No. 1 Detention Center. Pu Zhiqiang, a human rights lawyer and partner at the Huayi Law Firm in Beijing, was charged on May 15, 2015 with “creating a disturbance” and “enciting ethnic hatred.” Pu suffers from medical conditions, including diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and prostatitis (an infection of the prostate that, if left untreated, can spread to other parts of the body, including the kidneys, and possibly lead to organ failure). Officials confiscated his medication when he arrived at the detention facility in Beijing, and he was later offered pills that he did not recognize. Pu’s lawyer Zhang Sizhi (张思之) visited his client on June 9, 2014, and Pu said he has now been given some treatment for diabetes, including insulin, but that his legs are swollen, a typical sign that a diabetic patient is not being properly treated. He also told Zhang that he has been subjected to interrogation for 10 hours a day, which is likely only to worsen his health. Zhang visited Pu again in July, and reported that Pu’s conditions have led to a general swollenness. Zhang has sought Pu’s release on medical grounds multiple times, with the second application denied on June 9 on the grounds that Pu would “pose a danger to society” if released, and the third application in July also rejected. Pu was taken to a hospital on August 15, 2015 due to shortness of breath and was given traditional Chinese medicine before being released. His lawyer Shang Baojun (尚宝军) visited him two days later and reported his health is not good, including worsening of his prostatitis, not being able to sleep, and high blood sugar. Pu Zhiqiang, a human rights lawyer and partner at the Huayi Law Firm in Beijing, was charged on May 15, 2015 with “creating a disturbance” and “enciting ethnic hatred.” Pu suffers from medical conditions, including diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and prostatitis (an infection of the prostate that, if left untreated, can spread to other parts of the body, including the kidneys, and possibly lead to organ failure). Officials confiscated his medication when he arrived at the detention facility in Beijing, and he was later offered pills that he did not recognize. Pu’s lawyer Zhang Sizhi (张思之) visited his client on June 9, 2014, and Pu said he has now been given some treatment for diabetes, including insulin, but that his legs are swollen, a typical sign that a diabetic patient is not being properly treated. He also told Zhang that he has been subjected to interrogation for 10 hours a day, which is likely only to worsen his health. Zhang visited Pu again in July, and reported that Pu’s conditions have led to a general swollenness. Zhang has sought Pu’s release on medical grounds multiple times, with the second application denied on June 9 on the grounds that Pu would “pose a danger to society” if released, and the third application in July also rejected. Pu was taken to a hospital on August 15, 2015 due to shortness of breath and was given traditional Chinese medicine before being released. His lawyer Shang Baojun (尚宝军) visited him two days later and reported his health is not good, including worsening of his prostatitis, not being able to sleep, and high blood sugar.

 

Qin Yongmin (秦永敏), veteran Chinese dissident and his wife Zhao Suli (赵素利), have been "forcibly disappeared" for over three months. http://www.rfa.org/english/news/china/search-04172015101633.html

 

Su Changlan (苏昌兰), an activist working on women’s and children’s rights, was detained on 27 October 2014 and formally arrested on 3 December 2014, after she expressed support for the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong. Since 1999, she had provided assistance to rural married women in Guangdong, whose land had been taken away. She was fired and harassed and put under house arrest in connection with organising rights defence activities. Her husband, Chen Dequan, was beaten by the local authorities and suffered permanent injuries to his legs.

 

Tang Jingling Guangzhou-based human rights lawyer, was criminally detained in mid-May 2014 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” After police seized Tang, they searched his residence and confiscated a laptop, a tablet computer, cell phones, and books. On the same day, police took into custody two other Guangzhou activists, Wang Qingying and Yuan Xinting, who are close associates of lawyer Tang in the “Non-violent Citizens’ Disobedience Movement” (see below). When Tang’s lawyer Liu Zhengqing (刘正清) met with him at Baiyun District Detention Center on May 21, 2014, Tang told Liu about mistreatment he had suffered, including being physically assaulted by a guard. Tang was later moved to the Guangzhou No. 1 Detention Center and formally arrested on a more serious charge of “inciting subversion of state power.” Tang has been denied visits from his lawyer since his arrest. began practicing law in Guangdong Province in 2000. He worked on cases involving human rights violations and had defended villagers combating corruption, victims of counterfeit medicine and vaccinations, uncompensated victims of land grabs, and arrested human rights defenders. In 2006, Chinese authorities refused to renew Tang’s attorney license after he worked with rights activist Guo Feixiong (郭飞雄) on an election recall case in Taishi Village in Guangdong. After his disbarment, Tang continued to help with human rights cases by serving as a “citizen representative” or providing legal assistance. In February 2011, during the Jasmine Movement, Tang was charged with “inciting subversion” and kept in a black jail where he was tortured, including extensive sleep deprivation. The charges were dropped five months later and he was released. Tang Jingling has worked with the “Non-violent Citizens’ Disobedience Movement,” a network of activists pushing for legal and social reform on issues such as labor rights, equal education, and the unequal hukou system in order to bring about a liberal democracy in China. Specific actions that he has initiated include “reclaiming ballot papers” (refusing to vote in unfair elections), 5000-day Countdown to Saying Goodbye to Dictatorship and “June Fourth Meditation” (commemorating the June Fourth massacre through meditation). Police have detained, threatened, and tortured Tang in retaliation for taking on cases involving a wide range of human rights abuses and for his activism. Reprisals against Tang have even affected his religious practice; he and his wife were denied attendance at an underground church that they belonged to, out of fear that local authorities would retaliate. In addition, his wife was harassed and threatened after his mother, apparently overwhelmed by her son’s detention, passed away several months after lawyer Tang was seized.

 

Thamkey Gyatso (坦科加错 Tan-Ke-JiaCuo). Tibetan Buddhist monk Thamkey Gyatso, from Labrang Tashikyil monastery, is serving a 15-year sentence following his involvement in peaceful political protests in 2008 and possibly also linked to his writings for literary journals. Thamkey Gyatso, who is in his early thirties, was arrested on April 29, 2008 in Labrang, following the major protests in March, 2008. Although he was known to be in good health before his detention, the right side of Thamkey’s body is now paralyzed and he can no longer walk. “His right eye, ear, hand and leg are no longer functional,” said the source. “He has received some medical treatment but nothing that has helped him to recover. He is unable to move and he just sits on a wheelchair. He can still speak slowly and recognize people.”

 

Migmar Dhondup (明玛东知 Ming-Ma-Dong-Zhi)  Migmar Dhondup was arrested in connection with the protests in March, 2008, and sentenced to 14 years imprisonment. He is in his early thirties and worked for a Western NGO, the KunDe Foundation in Tibet, which is committed to helping marginalized and impoverished communities. No information is known about his welfare and whereabouts. Migmar Dhondup, who speaks fluent English and is very well educated, was accused of providing “intelligence concerning the security and interests of the state and provid[ing] it to the Dalai clique… prior to and following the ‘March 14’ incident”, a reference to the Tibetan government in exile in Dharamsala, although there is no evidence that he passed on any information. Dhondup is a well-educated Tibetan passionate about nature conservation who was educated in exile.

 

Tulku Phurbu Tsering Rinpoche (普布泽仁仁波切 aka Pangri-na Rinpoche 布绒朗仁波切) – Unknown medical condition, currently emaciated and weak. Date of Birth: January 2, 1957, Place of Detention: Mianyang Prison, Sichuan Province. Phurbu Tsering Rinpoche is a highly respected reincarnated Tulku (Living Buddha) of the Tehor Kardze Monastery and the head of the Pangri and Ya-tseg nunneries in Kardze (Ch: Ganzi) Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in Sichuan. He has been serving an eight-and-a-half-year sentence on a trumped-up “illegally owning guns and explosives” charge since 2009. Rinpoche initially disappeared in May 2008 after a group of nuns held a peaceful protest in Kardze.In August 2014, a source of the Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy met Rinpoche in prison, and described him as unrecognizable; Rinpoche is weak and emaciated. It is believed that his health has deteriorated due to severe conditions in confinement. Rinpoche’s lawyers during his December 2009 trial, Li Fangping (李方平) and Jiang Tianyong (江天勇), reported he had been severely tortured and forced to confess while he was held incommunicado in 2008.

 

Wang Bingzhang (王炳章), born in 1947, a veteran US-based Chinese democracy activist has been sentenced to life in prison since 2003, being held in solitary confinement. Wang was abducted by Chinese security forces along the border of China and Vietnam in 2002. He suffers from chronic phlebitis, severe allergies, untreated depression, and has been stricken with at least three strokes in the last six years.

 

Wang Yu (王宇), female, lawyer at the Fengrui Law Firm in Beijing, is under “residential surveillance at a designated location” on orders of Tianjin PSB. She is being held on suspicion of “creating a disturbance” and “inciting subversion of state power.” Wang’s status was initially unclear after she was taken away from her home in the early morning of July 9, and state media reported she had been put under criminal detention. Her lawyers have been blocked from visiting her on the grounds that her case involves national security. Wang had initialy been taken into custody after dropped off her husband Bao Longjun and their teenage son at the Beijing airport in the evening of June 8, but they never boarded their flight. Her son has been released into the care of his aunt. He was reportedly beaten by police, who also confiscated his passport and have repeatedly questioned him. Wang Yu has represented a number of high-profile political cases, including activist Cao Shunli (曹顺利), Uyghur scholar Ilham Tohti (伊力哈木.土赫提), and more recently Wu Gan (吴淦), aka “The Butcher” (屠夫), as well sensitive cases involving Falun Gong practitioners, Hong Kong supporters, and other defenders. She recently has been the victim of a smear campaign orchestrated by the official Xinhua News Agency, related to a 2008 railway incident in Tianjin during which she was sentenced to two-and-a-half years in prison. The inclusion of Tianjin police in the raids may indicate a connection to the case and the smear campaign. More imprisoned lawyers and activists during the July 2015 Crackdown http://chrlawyers.hk/en/content/1900-2-october-2015-least-288-lawyers-law-firm-staff-human-right-activists-and-family

 

Wang Yonghang (王永航) – Tuberculosis, pleural and peritoneal effusions, Date of Birth: February 17, 1973, Place of Detention: Shenyang No. 1 Prison, Liaoning Province. Wang Yonghang, a human rights lawyer, has been serving a seven-year sentence for “using a cult to undermine implementation of the law” since 2009. Wang has been suffering from several serious illnesses in prison and may be paralyzed from torture. His wife Yu Xiaoyan (于晓艳) learned in January 2012 that her husband was infected with tuberculosis, had pleural and peritoneal effusions – the collection of fluid in the chest and abdominal cavities – and was numb from the waist down. Wang’s condition worsened, and he was admitted to hospital in May 2014. Wang is also reportedly so weak that he can barely talk. When police seized Wang on July 4, 2009, he was severely beaten, suffering fractures in his right ankle. The injury was not promptly treated (surgery was not performed until August 11 of that year), which led to a serious infection. The infection has persisted. Wang’s family and lawyer have not been allowed to meet Wang during his detention because, according to the police, his case involves “state secrets.” While detained in the Dalian City Detention Center, Wang went on a hunger strike to protest the beating of fellow inmates who were Falun Gong practitioners. A prison doctor force-fed Wang, which caused respiratory tract bleeding and nearly fatal suffocation. Guards handcuffed Wang and shackled him to a makeshift bed on the floor for about 48 hours as punishment for his hunger strike. After Wang was transferred to Shenyang No. 1 Prison in October 2010, he was reportedly beaten by other inmates acting on instructions from the prison police, and was put in solitary confinement later that month. Wang’s wife has been prevented from seeing her husband, subjected to surveillance, and warned not to discuss his health with anyone.

Wu Gan (吴淦), online name “Super Vulgar Butcher” or the “Butcher”, On May 19, rights activist Wu Gan (吴淦), better known for his online name “Super Vulgar Butcher” or the “Butcher” for short, set up two pull-up standees in front of the Jiangxi Province Higher People’s Court. He was there to protest the court’s denial of the defense’s access to files of the “Leping Wrongful Conviction Case” (“乐平冤案”). In May 2002, police arrested four suspects in a case of robbery, rape, and dismemberment that occurred in Leping, Jiangxi province, in 2000. The four confessed under torture and were sentenced to death with a stay of execution. In early November 2011, a suspect in another case claimed responsibility for the crime. In light of the admission, rights lawyers took on the case by representing the four and requesting a retrial, but the Jiangxi Higher Court refused their repeated and lawful request to review the case files. This case, as well as the Nie Shubin case (聂树斌案) and the recently overturned Huugjilt case, are among the typical cases of miscarriage of justice that China’s rights lawyers pursue. Correcting wrongs in China’s faulty judicial system is at best difficult, if not impossible altogether, and rights lawyers have, over time, come to develop methods to put pressure on the courts. On that day, the lawyers for the four victims had already staged a sit-in outside the courthouse for over a week to no avail. http://www.chinesepen.org/english/tag/wu-gan

 

Yang Tongyan (杨同彦, aka Yang Tianshui (杨天水), a writer, is critically ill, raise serious concerns about the treatment of detainees in Chinese prisons and detention centers. Yang, currently serving a 12-year sentence for “subversion of state power” in Nanjing Prison, has been hospitalized since mid-September 2009. Yang is ill with a myriad of illnesses, which include intestinal tuberculosis, tuberculous peritonitis, diabetes, kidney inflammation, and high blood pressure.

 

Yu Shiwen (于世文) , a student organiser at Zhongsan University during the 1989 pro-democracy movement, was disappeared on 23 May 2014, until May 28, when their family received a notice saying he had been criminally detained on charges of “gathering a crowd to disrupt order of a public place.” The charges apparently stem from their organizing a June Fourth memorial event in February 2014 in the hometown of Zhao Ziyang (赵紫阳), a former CCP secretary-general who was dethroned for his efforts to stop the 1989 Beijing massacre, and was under constant house arrest until his death in 2005. Of several dozen people who had gathered for the activity, at least 10 have been detained since May. When he was formally arrested in July, the charges against him had been changed. Yu reportedly suffers from hypertension and hereditary cardiovascular disease, which had led to his father’s death. In July 2014, Yu suffered a stroke in detention after not being provided any medication to manage his illnesses. He was sent to the detention center’s hospital for treatment, but his hands and feet were almost always shackled to his bed, which was unbearable for Yu, who decided in the end to return to his cell instead.

 

Zhang Lin (张林) – Unknown eye infection, cervical spondylosis, disabled right leg, odontopathy, Date of Birth: June 2, 1963, Place of Detention: Bengbu City No. 1 Detention Center, Anhui Province. Zhang Lin, a democracy activist, has been detained since July 2013. Tried on charges of “gathering a crowd to disrupt order of a public place” in December 2013, a court in Anhui Province has yet to issue its ruling.Zhang is suffering from ill health as a result of torture and mistreatment he suffered during years of detention. He has cervical spondylosis, a painful condition caused by the degeneration of joints in the vertebrae, and odontopathy (dental disease). Zhang is also unable to bend his right leg. According to his daughters, he has also developed an infection in his left eye in detention that is threatening his vision, and it is unclear what kind of treatment he has received for it. Zhang’s lawyer Liu Xiaoyuan (刘晓原) applied for his release on bail in July 2013, but the application was turned down on the grounds that Zhang would be a “danger to society” if he were released. Liu made a second request in August in order to for Zhang to take care of his two young daughters and in light of his illnesses, but that request was also turned down.

Zhu Yufu (朱虞夫) – Coronary heart disease, cerebral vascular sclerosis, lumbar disk herniation, hypertension, high cholesterol, Date of Birth: February 13, 1953, Place of Detention: Zhejiang Provincial No. 4 Prison, Hangzhou City, Zhejiang Province, Zhu Yufu, a veteran democracy activist, has been serving a seven-year sentence for “inciting subversion of state power” since 2012. Zhu suffers from a number of conditions, some of which were brought about by torture or exacerbated by prison conditions. Authorities have rejected or ignored his family’s numerous requests for medical parole, including one from his wife Zhang Hangli (姜杭丽) shortly after he was arrested. Zhu discovered in the 1990s that he had vascular hypertrophy (thickening of vascular walls in the heart), arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), and coronary heart disease. In March 2012, Zhu Yufu suffered a sudden onset of cerebral vascular sclerosis (narrowing of blood vessels in the brain) after prison guards tortured him. In November 2012, Zhu was only able to walk by leaning up against a wall for support. A coronary artery tumor, lumbar disc herniation, and hypertension—all exacerbated during previous incarcerations—continued to go untreated. He has become emaciated due to malnutrition.Zhu’s wife had observed during a prison visit in April 2013 that his head was swollen, and Zhu stressed to her that he feared that he would not survive much longer in prison because of his declining health. She also reported his health declined in part due to deprivations and abuses that had occurred in retaliation for his family’s trip to the United States, during which they sought support for his release. In May 2013, he reportedly had several fainting spells due to physical weakness, and in December his wife made her fourth application for release on medical parole, which she sent to several different provincial government offices in addition to the prison. His wife has faced reprisals for demanding his release, and has been threatened by police not to discuss her husband’s health conditions. During a recent visit in January 2014, family members found that Zhu suffers from regular headaches and high blood pressure. Authorities reportedly told the family not to apply for medical parole again, as it would be “useless,” but they applied anyway. After they received the application, prison authorities gave Zhu an electrocardiogram and blood pressure test, then told the family that he didn’t meet the “conditions for medical parole.”

More prisoners of conscience: https://www.amnesty.org.uk/blogs/countdown-china/human-rights-issues-should-be-highlighted-china-tibet-east-turkestan

 

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1 comment

Kudos to Amnesty International for campaigning against political repression in China! This is what you should be doing--this is consistent with the founding principles of AI.

If only you would jettison the unwelcome accretions that you've taken on: pro-abortionism (why don't babies have 'human rights;?), pro-homosexualist (let's be honest and call a mental illness a mental illness) and narrow economic policies. Back to your roots!

tony.v.phillips 2 years ago