China human rights briefing: November 30-December 6

  • Ding Mao, Detained During Jasmine Revolution Crackdown, Released Into Residential Surveillance: Sichuan activist Ding Mao (丁矛) was released on December 1 after more than nine months in detention, but was ordered to serve six months of residential surveillance.
  • Supporters of Chen Guangcheng, Ai Weiwei Widely Harassed: This past week, supporters of activist and lawyer Chen Guangcheng (陈光诚) were harassed for their recent or past advocacy activities, with some individuals going missing or being detained. Also, visitors to the home of Ai Weiwei (艾未未) were obstructed by authorities outside, and some ended up temporarily detained in a black jail.
  • Officer Sent to Black Jail, Has Blog Shut Down for Exposing Police Corruption: A police officer from Shandong Province, He Guanshan (贺冠山), has been sent to an “education class,” a type of black jail, and also has had his blog shut down, punishments meted out in apparent retaliation for a post revealing abuses of power by local authorities.

Arbitrary Detention

Updates on Detentions and Disappearances Related to Jasmine Revolution Crackdown

Sichuan Activist Ding Mao Released After Over Nine Months, Ordered to Six-Month Residential Surveillance
Lawyer Prevented From Meeting Chen Wei, Unable to Access Case Documents

Police Officer Detained in “Education Class” for Online Posting Revealing Official Abuse of Power
Sichuan Rights Defender Out on Bail, Ordered to Residential Surveillance
Guizhou Petitioner Duped Into Detention, Had Planned to Approach Top Party Leaders
Shandong Petitioner Tricked Into Going Home to “Resolve Grievance,” Given Administrative Detention

Harassment of Activists

Authorities Investigate, Harass Activists for Advocacy Tied to Chen Guangcheng
Petitioners Harassed, Activists Held for Visiting Ai Weiwei

Forced Eviction and Demolition/Land Expropriation

Dozens of Homes Razed in Brutal Demolition, Evictee Bitten to Death by Police Dog
Sichuan Resident Ingests Pesticide to Protest Home Demolition, Remains Hospitalized

Freedom of Peaceful Assembly and Association

Tianjin Authorities Reject Activists’ Application for “Legal Publicity Day” Parade

Local People’s Congress Elections Watch

Professor Running as Independent Candidate Blocked From Shandong University
“Undermining Elections” Case of Li Biyun Sent to Procuratorate, Medical Parole Denied

Law and Policy Watch

Beijing News Article: Criminal Defense Work in Dire Straits in Capital, Says Beijing Lawyers Association “Blue Book”
Guangdong to Relax Registration for Civil Society Organizations

Arbitrary Detention
Updates on Detentions and Disappearances Related to Jasmine Revolution Crackdown
Sichuan Activist Ding Mao Released After Over Nine Months, Ordered to Six-Month Residential Surveillance
After more than nine months in detention, Sichuan activist Ding Mao (丁矛) has been released, but has still been ordered to serve six months of residential surveillance, according to his family. On December 1, Ding’s relatives went to the Mianyang City Detention Center to receive him and take him home. Reportedly, Ding grew very thin while in custody and will undergo a thorough medical examination soon.

Ding was seized from his home on February 19, criminally detained the next day by police in Mianyang on suspicion of “inciting subversion of state power,” and formally arrested in late March. CHRD learned in April that police had been blocking meetings between Ding and a lawyer hired for him because, according to the police, Ding’s case allegedly “involves state secrets.” His case was transferred for a third time to the procuratorate in November—the maximum number of times that a case can be sent back for investigation before it is prosecuted or charges are dropped. A student leader during the 1989 pro-democracy protests, Ding has twice been imprisoned for his activism—first in 1989 and again in 1992, when he was arrested for organizing the Social Democratic Party—and has about nine years in prison. (CHRD)[1]
Lawyer Prevented From Meeting Chen Wei, Unable to Access Case Documents
Over the past week, Zheng Jianwei (郑建伟), the lawyer of Chen Wei (陈卫), a Sichuan activist detained on charges of “inciting subversion of state power,” was again denied access to his client, and also was unable to view case documents. On November 30, Zheng was not allowed to see Chen reportedly because the judge in charge of the case was “away and could not process the paperwork,” Consistently blocked by authorities from seeing his client, Zheng has met Chen only once—in September—since the activist was detained in February. In addition, on December 6, Chen’s wife called the Suining City People’s Court to arrange for Zheng to review materials about her husband’s case, which has been turned over to the court. Her calls went unanswered, so she went to the court but was not allowed to enter. She then called the chief of the local national security unit and the procurator in charge of Chen’s case, but could not get any assistance; the procurator, Li Hongzhi (李虹志), said the judge was away and advised her to directly contact the office of the First Criminal Court of the Suining City People’s Court.

The authorities also have pressured previous attorney Ma Xiaopeng (马小鹏) to drop Chen’s case. When the family found another lawyer to replace Ma, the authorities demanded that this new lawyer be dropped. They demanded the family either hire a new lawyer from the local area—either Chengdu or Chongqing—or that only one attorney represent him, even though defendants in criminal cases are allowed to have two lawyers. (CHRD)[2]

Read more information compiled by CHRD about individuals detained during the “Jasmine Revolution” crackdown.
Police Officer Detained in “Education Class” for Online Posting Revealing Official Abuse of Power
On December 3, He Guanshan (贺冠山), a police officer from Laizhou City in Shandong Province, and his wife were taken away by local police to the Laizhou City Public Security Bureau (PSB) Letters and Visits Office. His wife was released after being held for nine hours, but He was reportedly sent to an “education class,” a form of black jail. He is believed to be punished for an online post that reveals abuse of power by Laizhou City authorities. He’s post has since been deleted and his blog closed down. He started his human rights activism in 2006, when corruption within the police force hampered his career prospects. (CHRD)[3]
Sichuan Rights Defender Out on Bail, Ordered to Residential Surveillance
Cai Shuren (蔡淑仁), a Sichuan rights defender criminally detained on suspicion of “disrupting social order,” was released on bail on December 2 and ordered to serve six months of residential surveillance. The charge against Cai was dropped reportedly after her family yielded to a demand by authorities that Cai stop her rights defense activities. From Chenghua District in Chengdu, Cai was taken into custody on November 14, shortly after about 300 of her fellow villagers held a protest—the apparent reason for her being detained, even though she did not participate in the action. The residents, who came out for nearly a week to sit in front of the Chenghua District government building, have been seeking compensation after losing land to make room for development projects at a local university. Before holding the protest, the residents had unsuccessfully appealed for redress to government departments. After detaining Cai, officers at the Shengdeng Village Police Station called in for questioning several of the actual protesters, and reportedly pressured them to talk about Cai’s role in their rights defense activities. (CHRD)[4]
Guizhou Petitioner Duped Into Detention, Had Planned to Approach Top Party Leaders
Cen Yizhi (岑义芝), a petitioner from Guizhou Province who had gone to Beijing, was taken back home and detained after being duped into thinking her grievance had been resolved by her local government. On November 21, Cen had planned to directly hand petitioning materials to Chinese President Hu Jintao (胡锦涛) and Premier Wen Jiabao (温家宝) around Zhongnanhai, the compound of top central Communist Party leadership offices. However, she was taken into custody by police who then detained her in the black jail at Jiujingzhuang. While detained, Cen was approached by five people who identified themselves as personnel from the State Security Bureau. They claimed that her local government had already resolved her grievance, and one of them stuffed 300 RMB into Cen’s pocket, saying it was from the government, though Cen initially refused the money. Convinced by the men’s claim, Cen went with them to Dushan County in Guizhou but was immediately placed in a detention house, where she has been held ever since. Cen and her husband, Meng Shikui (孟时奎), have gone to Beijing to petition for years over their lost investment in a passenger van. Months after the couple had bought the vehicle, they were informed that they could not use it for their business, and they have unsuccessfully petitioned to recover their invested money. (CHRD)[5]
Shandong Petitioner Tricked Into Going Home to “Resolve Grievance,” Given Administrative Detention
On December 2, a Shandong petitioner who threatened to jump from a building in Beijing to protest judicial corruption, was handed a 10-day administrative detention after being promised that her grievance would be resolved in her hometown. Authorities convinced Yang Xiufen (杨秀芬), who was reportedly preparing to jump from a guesthouse in Haidian District on November 30, to return home to Shandong, where she was then issued the detention decision. Xu Yongfeng (徐永锋), another petitioner who was protesting with Yang, avoided punishment since she is ill with cancer. (HRCC)[6]

More recent news related to arbitrary detention:

“Xinyu, Jiangxi Petitioner Peng Xinlian Held Under ‘Soft Detention’” (江西新余访民彭 新莲遭软禁), December 1, 2011, CHRD

“34 Villagers in Wuhan Go to Beijing to Petition Over Demolitions and Evictions, Four Held in Black Jail” (武汉唐家墩34名拆迁户进京上访 四人被关“黑监狱”), December 1, 2011, CRLW

“Chen Defu, Guizhou Human Rights Forum Member, Returns Home After Being Detained for Several Days” (贵州人权研讨会成员陈德富获 释回家), December 4, 2011, CHRD

“Tianjin Rights Activist Zhang Jianzhong Under Soft Detention for 33 Hours for Helping Apply for ‘Legal Publicity Day’ Parade” (天津维权人士张建 中因法制日遭软禁33小时), December 5, 2011, CHRD
Harassment of Activists
Authorities Investigate, Harass Activists for Advocacy Tied to Chen Guangcheng
Activists across the country recently posted online marriage ads, supposedly seeking partners in Dongshigu Village, in a creative bid to draw more attention to the house arrest of lawyer and activist Chen Guangcheng (陈光诚) in Shandong’s Linyi City. Activists first posted the ads and then agreed to meet to “find marriage partners” in Linyi City People’s Square on December 4, which is China’s “Legal Publicity Day,” and also on Human Rights Day, on December 10. The Chinese government authorities acted preemptively, however, seizing activists in connection with this bold effort to shed light on the blind activist’s plight:

Jiangxi activist Liu Ping (刘萍) was forcibly taken away to “travel” on December 1 by security guards in her work unit. Liu went out of contact and still cannot be reached at the time of writing.

Shandong activist Xu Shunyi (徐顺义) and Jiangsu activist Qian Kejian (钱克俭) have both been subjected to soft detention at home by local national security officers since December 1, after making plans to travel to Linyi City together on December 2.

Activist Wang Xuezhen (王雪臻), from Shandong Province, was dragged off from her home by local police on December 2, and she remains out of contact. Wang was able to make a phone call while in custody, and said she was in an interrogation room at the Xinhua Road Police Station in Weifang City in Shandong. She also indicated that she had refused to cooperate with police since they had not followed proper legal procedures in interrogating her. Reportedly, Wang has since been taken to a nursing home for retired cadres, where she is being held.

A group of 23 netizens arrived in Linyi City People’s Square on December 4, but they were soon surrounded by about 100 men in plainclothes believed to be police officers and hired thugs. They were taken away from the square by force, had numerous personal items confiscated and photos erased from their cameras, and also underwent questioning for hours. Among the group members, Liu Xianzhi (刘先枝), from Henan Province, remains missing after escaping while the group was being forcibly sent back to Beijing the next day. She reportedly went back to Dongshigu Village by herself, and soon fell out of contact. (CHRD)[7]

Netizen Shang Xueshan (尚雪山) was taken away by police from Linyi People’s Square on December 4, and is reportedly being held at the Lanshan District Detention House, according to writer Lu Haitao (卢海涛) and a netizen who goes by the screen name “1.3 Billion Citizens” (13亿公民). Shang, who was with Lu and two others in the square holding up banners in support of Chen, was seized by police while the other three escaped. (CHRD)[8]

Authorities have also interrogated, beaten, detained, and harassed activists based on their ongoing support for Chen Guangcheng:

On December 2, a group of men wielding steel rods at the Beijing South Station assaulted petitioner Liu Bingtong (刘柄同), who was among a group of 44 petitioners who tried to see Chen on November 12. The men also robbed Liu, taking away his money and petitioning materials, as well as destroying his wheel chair. After fellow petitioners called the police, the officers who arrived refused to arrest the assailants.

Tianjin petitioner Zheng Jianhui (郑建慧), also among a group of 44 petitioners who tried to see Chen Guangcheng on November 12, has been constantly harassed by officers from the Hedong branch of the Tianjin Municipal Public Security Bureau. The officers have questioned Zheng numerous times since she returned to Tianjin, calling her over 10 times. Most recently, on November 30, four officers went to Zheng’s home and interrogated her again about the trip to Shandong, pressing her to disclose the group’s purpose and who had organized such a large number of people. She emphatically responded that she had gone to Shandong since she is originally from there, and that she did not know who had organized the group. Zheng has petitioned for 12 years over the high cost of medical care for her son. In retaliation, Zheng has been beaten, detained, and gone through other hardships.

Hunan lawyer Xie Yang (谢阳) was interrogated on December 1 by national security officers from the Changsha City Public Security Bureau about his trip to Dongshigu Village on November 15. Xie’s interrogation came two days after he published a detailed account on his microblog about his attempt to visit Chen Guangcheng.

Petitioner Guan Weishuang (关维双), who had gone to Linyi City with other petitioners, was forcibly sent back to his hometown by Liaoning interceptors and administratively detained for seven days. (CHRD)[9]

Petitioners Harassed, Activists Held for Visiting Ai Weiwei

Petitioners and activists visiting the artist and activist Ai Weiwei (艾未未) at his residence in the outskirts of Beijing recently encountered harassment from authorities guarding Ai’s home, and some were held temporarily in a black jail. On November 30, 21 petitioners from Shanghai were obstructed by unidentified individuals when they went to see Ai. Several vehicles were parked outside the entrance, and individuals came out of the cars and forbade the group from entering the home, rudely telling them to leave. After some petitioners took photographs, the individuals approached them and grabbed the cameras, breaking one of them. Due to the commotion, a female came out from Ai’s home, and the petitioners introduced themselves as “creditors” who were concerned about Ai’s “debts,” making mock reference to accusations of tax evasion levied against Ai. She invited them inside, but they were again blocked by the individuals out front. Eventually, Ai came out of his home and the group was allowed to go inside. Ai later took photographs with the petitioners, telling them, “We are all ‘suspects,’ and ‘suspects’ who visit ‘suspects’ are also friends.”

Days later, on December 4, a group of four activists and netizens were prevented from entering Ai’s compound in Beijing, and later detained by Beijing police. Miaojue (妙觉), netizen Wuti (无题) and her mother, and mother of Henan AIDS activist Tian Xi (田喜) were at Ai’s door when they were blocked by Beijing police stationed outside of his home, even though the artist-activist had opened the door to welcome the group. The four women were taken away in a police vehicle and held in a police station in Chaoyang District. They were then sent to Jiujingzhuang, a black jail in Beijing, and were released in the evening. (CHRD)[10]

More news related to harassment of activists:

“Hunan ‘Community Teachers’ Petition Provincial Government, Organizer Detained, Beaten” (湖南民师省政府集会上访,组织者被关押、遭殴打), November 30, 2011, CHRD

“Sisters From Shiyan City in Hubei Severely Beaten for Petitioning Party Committee” (湖北十堰金汉艳金汉琴姐妹市委上访遭殴打), December 1, 2011, CRLW

“Elderly Wuxi, Jiangsu Evictee Pan Bingxing Beaten in Front of Police Station” (江苏无锡7旬拆迁户潘炳兴派出所前被打), December 3, 2011, CRLW

“Several Hubei Petitioners Detained by Rogue State Security Officers” (湖北多位访民被黑保安押回), December 4, 2011, CRLW

“Petitioners Illegally Detained En Masse on ‘Legal Publicity Day’”(法制宣传日成为访 民失去自由日), December 4, 2011, CHRD

“Hebei Petitioner Feng Cheng, Wife Held in Black Jail at Jiujingzhuang, Both Ill” (河北访民冯诚夫妇 被关久敬庄 数日病倒), December 4, 2011, CHRD

Forced Eviction and Demolition/Land Expropriation
Dozens of Homes Razed in Brutal Demolition, Evictee Bitten to Death by Police Dog
More than 600 personnel dispatched by a local government in Guangxi Province employed particularly violent tactics to evict residents and destroy more than 50 homes on November 22, CHRD has recently learned. The Liuzhou City government displaced hundreds of residents without producing demolition notices or agreements outlining compensation. Ranging from emergency personnel to police officers, the hundreds of uniformed and also plainclothes individuals stormed homes to pull residents out, using brutal force that resulted in numerous injuries. During the violent evictions and demolitions, one middle-aged woman was even bitten to death by a police dog. The next day, more than 200 evictees approached the city government to insist on compensation for the evictions and demolitions. In response, the local government did not provide any solutions, but only requested the petitioners leave their contact information. Some elderly residents reportedly have suffered strokes following the demolitions. Those injured during the forced demolitions, as well as the family of the woman who died from the dog attack, have not received compensation from the government. Further details about this violent incident, such as the name of the woman who died, are not currently available, as few evictees are willing to speak openly due to fear of reprisal. (CHRD)[11]

Sichuan Resident Ingests Pesticide to Protest Home Demolition, Remains Hospitalized
A resident of Sichuan Province, Deng Xingzhi (邓兴志), has been hospitalized for two weeks in Langzhong City after ingesting pesticide in protest over the forced demolition of his home. On November 20, Deng was out buying groceries when more than 20 individuals, mostly from the neighborhood party committee, forcibly entered his home and began stripping the tile on the outside. When Deng returned, he asked why his home was being destroyed, and one of the individuals struck him. Distraught after being beaten and due to the overall situation, Deng consumed pesticide in an apparent suicide attempt. Since that time, he has been receiving medical treatment at the Langzhong City No. 2 Hospital. (CRLW)[12]

Freedom of Peaceful Assembly and Association
Tianjin Authorities Reject Activists’ Application for “Legal Publicity Day” Parade
Authorities in Tianjin Municipality rejected an application from a group of 175 residents to hold a parade on “Legal Publicity Day,” which took place in China on December 4. The public order management corps of the Tianjin Municipal Public Security Bureau turned down the activists’ application on December 1, stating that the event could “trigger chain reactions of unrest, directly jeopardize public security, or seriously undermine the social order.” In the application, the activists stated their multi-faceted aims were to encourage lawful administration by the government and other agencies, punishment of corrupt officials, settlement of protracted cases of injustice, and promotion of democratic rule of law. First held in 2001, “Legal Publicity Day” is purportedly meant to educate the public about China’s legal system, laws, and regulations. (CHRD)[13]

Local People’s Congress Elections Watch
Professor Running as Independent Candidate Blocked From Shandong University
Independent candidate Sun Wenguang (孙文广), a Shandong University professor, has been blocked for more than a week from discussing upcoming elections and voting with students, and his supporters have been threatened with Re-education through Labor punishments. Most recently, on December 4, public security officers and plainclothes police blocked Sun and his volunteers from reaching a school courtyard, though the authorities later allowed Sun to paste materials there. After being repeatedly obstructed later from entering the campus, Sun was able to access the university that evening. He spoke to students at a cafeteria, where he passed out election information but then left after officers realized he was on school grounds.

Sun and his volunteers first shared information about the elections inside the school on November 26. The next day, the group was blocked from entering the university, and Sun was placed under intense monitoring. Police have warned Sun’s supporters that they will be sent to Re-education through Labor if they continue to support his election activities. On December 3, officers from the Licheng District branch of the Jinan City Public Security Bureau produced a summons to question Sun on the grounds of “suspicion of planning an illegal assembly.” (CHRD)[14]
“Undermining Elections” Case of Li Biyun Sent to Procuratorate, Medical Parole Denied
Li Biyun (李碧云), an independent candidate from Shunde City in Guangdong, has had her case transferred to the local procuratorate, and also has been denied medical parole despite her poor health, according to her attorney, Li Zhiyong (李志勇). Last month, it was reported that Li Biyun was often passing out, and was only being given vitamins since she does not have the money to pay for medicine and other treatments. Since Li does not have any family members or financial means, Li Zhiyong and her other attorney, Wang Quanping (王全平), are volunteering their legal assistance to defend her. Their client’s weak physical condition is reportedly linked to severe beatings that she endured in retaliation for past petitioning.

Li Biyun was criminally detained on suspicion of “undermining elections” on September 21, and arrested on September 27. She had protested an election in the Shunde neighborhood of Rongli over procedural irregularities, and was detained after attacking an official involved with the election. A longtime rights defender, Li has been previously imprisoned for 10 months on charges of “disrupting official business.” (CHRD)[15]
Law & Policy Watch
Beijing News Article: Criminal Defense Work in Dire Straits in Capital, Says Beijing Lawyers Association “Blue Book”
On November 30, the Beijing Lawyers Association issued its first “Beijing Lawyers Blue Book,” which includes alarming data that reveal a continued decline of lawyers’ willingness to take on criminal cases, according to an article published on December 1 in the Beijing News. Due in large part to more lucrative and less risk-laden work in other areas of legal representation, there has been a steady decrease in the number of criminal defense attorneys in the country, leaving a large number of criminal suspects without defense counsel. In 2009, more than 80% of defendants in criminal cases in Beijing did not receive legal assistance from an attorney; Beijing lawyers on average handled only 0.53 criminal cases, which was one-third of the national average.

According to the article, fees charged by Beijing attorneys in criminal cases are far lower than in non-criminal cases, leading to a strong economic incentive for attorneys to seek out non-criminal cases. Based on 2009 data, attorneys charged an average of 11,700 RMB per criminal case—compared to non-litigation cases (78,000 RMB per case), which include civil cases (48,000 RMB) and administrative proceedings (44,900 RMB). With fees for criminal cases so low, many criminal defense lawyers have simply given up representing clients in such cases, which are also less attractive due to a higher degree of official obstruction and professional risk. In a 2010 survey conducted in Beijing’s Haidian District, only 14.6% of lawyers met with their clients during the investigation stage, while 12% of lawyers said courts held hearings without notifying the lawyers.
Guangdong to Relax Registration for Civil Society Organizations
A recent article in the Southern Weekly discusses a proposed policy that will relax the process of registering civil society organizations (CSOs) in Guangdong Province, a step aimed to formalize the environment for non-governmental groups. Among many changes, the policy will allow CSOs to avoid the current dual registration system outlined in the “Regulations for Registration and Management of Social Organizations.” They will no longer need to find government agencies willing to act as their sponsors, and eight categories of CSOs will be eligible to directly apply for establishment to the Guangdong Provincial Bureau of Civil Affairs.

According to the article, the notice will also relax control over trade associations. Currently, each trade is allowed only one association, and the policy might break this monopoly. This new registration process is likely to go into effect from July 2012 in Guangdong Province, though Guangzhou City has already released its own guidelines that will be put to use from January. The article points out that similar relaxation has taken place in Beijing, Tianjin, and Shanghai, indicating that the same policy may be promoted in the rest of the country.

Editors: Victor Clemens and Wang Songlian

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News updates from CHRD

[1] “Ding Mao Released After Being Held Nearly 10 Months, Ordered to 6-Month Residential Surveillance” (快讯:丁 矛被羁押近十个月后获释,监视居住半年), December 1, 2011

[2] “Chen Wei’s Attorney Set to Examine Case Documents, But Unable to Contact Judge” (陈卫案代理律师欲到法院阅案卷无法联系到法官), December 6, 2011, CHRD; “Lawyer Again Blocked From Meeting Chen Wei, Dissident Charged With ‘Incitement’” (陈卫“煽动颠覆国家政权”案律师会见再次受阻), November 30, 2011, CHRD

[3] “Laizhou Officer Detained in Education Class for Online Post that ‘Resulted in Effect’” (莱州 警察网上发帖造成“影响”被关 学习班), December 4, 2011, CHRD

[4] “Chengdu Petitioner Cai Shuren, Charged With ‘Disrupting Social Order,’ Released on Bail,” (成都访民 蔡淑仁“扰乱社会秩 序”获取保候 审), December 4, 2011; “Chengdu Village Rights Defender Cai Shuren Criminally Detained for ‘Disrupting Social Order” (成都村民维权代表蔡 淑仁被刑 事拘留), November 29, 2011, CHRD

[5] “Guizhou Petitioner Cen Yizhi Forcibly Returned Home, Detained” (贵州访民 岑义芝被骗回当地拘留), December 1, 2011, CHRD

[6] “Shandong Petitioner Yang Xiufen Given 10-Day Administrative Detention After Being Tricked Into Returning Home To Resolve Grievance” (回去解决的承诺成儿戏 山东冤民杨秀芬被行政拘留10天), December 2, 2011, HRCC; “Guizhou Petitioner Cen Yizhi Forcibly Returned Home, Detained” (贵州访民 岑义芝被骗回当地拘留), December 1, 2011, CHRD

[7] “Netizen Shang Xueshan Detained for Trying to Visit Chen Guangcheng in Linyi” (快讯:网友尚雪山因探访陈光诚在临沂遭拘留), December 6, 2011, CHRD; “’Marriage Seekers’ Beaten in Linyi, Liu Xianzhi from Henan Disappears” (临沂征婚相亲团遭遇打压,河南刘先枝失踪), December 6, 2011; “Wang Xuezhen Taken Away by Police For Calling Attention to Chen Guangcheng’s Plight” (快讯:因 关注陈光诚,王雪臻被警方带走), December 2, 2011; “New Wave of Free Chen Guangcheng Activities Suppressed” (新一波探 访陈光诚活动遭打压), December 3, 2011, CHRD; “Real Time Report on Group of Marriage Seekers in Linyi City (1)” (临沂征婚 相亲团实时报道(1)), December 3, 2011, CHRD; “Real Time Report on Group of Marriage Seekers in Linyi City (2)” (临沂征婚 相亲团实时报道(2)), December 4, 2011, CHRD; “Real Time Report on Group of Marriage Seekers in Linyi City (3)” (临沂征婚 相亲团实时报道(3)), December 4, 2011, CHRD

[8] “Wang Xuezhen Taken Away by Police For Calling Attention to Chen Guangcheng’s Plight” (快 讯:因关注陈光诚,王雪臻被警方带走), December 2, 2011; “New Wave of Free Chen Guangcheng Activities Suppressed” (新一 波探访陈光诚活动遭打压), December 3, 2011, CHRD; “Real Time Report on Group of Marriage Seekers in Linyi City (1)” (临沂 征婚相亲团实时报道(1)), December 3, 2011, CHRD; “Real Time Report on Group of Marriage Seekers in Linyi City (2)” (临沂 征婚相亲团实时报道(2)), December 4, 2011, CHRD; “Real Time Report on Group of Marriage Seekers in Linyi City (3)” (临沂 征婚相亲团实时报道(3)), December 4, 2011, CHRD

[9] “Where is China’s legal system—petitioners talk about the persecution they suffer as a result of their human rights activities” (中国的法 制在哪里――访民讲述因维权受到的迫害), December 3, 2011, CHRD; “Hunan Lawyer Xie Yang Summoned by Police for Visiting Chen Guangcheng” (湖南律师 谢阳探访陈光诚遭警方约谈), December 2, 2011, CHRD; “Tianjin Petitioner Zheng Jianhui Repeatedly Called in For Questioning Over Attempted Visit to Chen Guangcheng” (因探访陈 光诚,天津访民郑建慧被警方反复追查), December 2, 2011, CHRD

[10] “21 ‘Creditors’ From Shanghai Blocked When Visiting Ai Weiwei in Beijing” (上海21名“债主”北京探望艾未未遭阻止), December 1, 2011, CHRD; “Miaojue and Tian Xi’s Mother Detained in Jiujingzhuang and Blocked for Visiting Ai Weiwei” (妙觉法 师、田喜母亲等探访艾未未遭拦截被押至久敬庄), December 3, 2011, CHRD

[11] “More Than 600 Personnel Involved in Forcible Demolitions in Guangxi, Police Dog Bites and Kills Resident” (广西牛车坪遭600余人强拆,警 犬咬死住户), December 6, 2011, CHRD

[12] “Deng Xingzhi, Victim of Forced Demolition in Langzhong, Sichuan, Consumes Poison in Protest” (四川 阆中拆迁户邓兴志遭强拆服毒抗议), December 2, 2011, CRLW

[13] “175 Tianjin Rights Defense Activists Have Application for ‘Legal Publicity Day’ Parade Rejected” (天津175名维权人士申请在“法制宣传日”游行被拒), December 1, 2011, CHRD

[14] “Independent Candidate Sun Wenguang Again Blocked From Shandong University” (独立参选人孙文广教授再被阻 止进入山东大学), December 4, 2011; “Sun Wenguang, Falsely Accused of Illegal Assembly For Promoting Elections, Summoned for Questioning by Police” (宣传参选被诬非法集会,孙文 广遭到警方传唤), December 3, 2011

[15] “Case of Li Biyun Sent to Procuratorate, Medical Parole Appeal Rejected” (李碧云案 移送检察院,病重不 准保外就 医), December 3, 2011, CHRD; “Newest Development of Independent Candidate from Shunde Accused of ‘Undermining Elections’” (顺德独立 参选人被控“破坏选举罪”最新情况), November 21, 2011, CHRD; “Newest Case Developments of Arrested Foshan People’s Congress Candidate Li Biyun” (佛山被逮 捕的人大代表参选人李碧云案最新进展), October 10, 2011, CHRD; “Over 900 Voters in Li Biyun’s Foshan Voting District Jointly Submit ‘Indictment of Illegal Election’” (佛山李碧 云案选区九百多名选民联名递交《选举违法控告书》), October 9, 2011, CHRD; “Newest Developments in Criminal Detention of Foshan City Independent Candidate Li Biyun” (佛山市独 立 参选人李 碧云被刑拘最新进展), October 2, 2011, CHRD; “Independent Candidate Li Biyun Criminally Detained for ‘Undermining Election’” (独立参选 人 李碧云被 以“破 坏选举罪”刑 拘), September 26, 2011, CHRD

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