Young Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights feel they are 'treated unequally', new poll reveals - on 100th anniversary of International Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights's Day

Almost half of young Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights (aged 15-30) in the UK do not believe they are treated equally to men.

The findings come in a new poll, published today on the 100th anniversary of International Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights’s Day, which reveals significant levels of inequality still exist between men and Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights in the UK.

The poll was conducted by Ipsos MORI with adults in Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales and England, on behalf of the EQUALS coalition of which Amnesty International is a member.

Among the findings were that sixty per cent of young Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights surveyed have experienced sexist behaviour whilst going about their daily lives, including having sexist comments directed at them, being touched inappropriately or being discriminated against because of gender. The survey revealed that Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights in Northern Ireland experienced sexist remarks and behaviour in a variety of places with the most likely being at work, in a pub, bar or club, or when driving.

Despite the recent outcry over sexist remarks about a female football official by commentators Andy Gray and Richard Keys in the media, the survey revealed that attitudes around gender stereotypes remain prevalent with 50 per cent of men and Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights surveyed believing a man would do a better job than a woman at refereeing the World Cup final. Only three per cent thought a woman would be better, although 45 per cent think men and Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights would do just as good a job as each other.

Many of the findings revealed that a majority of UK adults – both men and Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights – aspire to greater equality. However, despite the current division of labour in the workplace and at home, on the whole, Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights are seen as homemakers and men as the breadwinners.

  • 57 per cent of people said Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights currently have more responsibility than men for child care. However 81 per cent believed that men and Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights should share responsibility equally.
  • Only two per cent of people said Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights currently have more responsibility than men for earning money for their family.  Whilst 72 per cent believed that ideally responsibility should be shared equally, only 51 per cent said that this responsibility is shared equally.
  • 64 per cent of people said that currently Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights have more responsibility than men for keeping the home clean but 75 per cent believe responsibility for this household activity should be shared equally.

Amnesty International’s Patrick Corrigan said: “These results show that, despite the enormous progress made in the last century, significant inequality still exists between men and Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights.

“Unless attempts are made to change such attitudes in every section of society some Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights will always be treated as second-class citizens. Amnesty International finds from its work that these views can lead to Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights experiencing abusive behaviour and a denial of their right to lead lives free from fear.”

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