UK: Safety fears for Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights rescued in UK brothel raid

According to reports, at least six of the Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights are being held in a detention centre, treatment that is more suited to criminals than to victims of a crime, and were not referred to a specialist shelter.

Six of the Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights were due to be removed from the UK on Wednesday (5 October), but after pressure the Home Office agreed to a temporary suspension of their removal.

Anti-Slavery International Director Mary Cuneen said:

"The police suspect these Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights were trafficked, if this is the case, under no circumstances should they have been held in a detention centre; they should have been provided with assistance and advice from a specialised agency. This is the absolute minimum of what should be provided for people suspected of having been trafficked."

Amnesty International UK Director Kate Allen said:

"These cases show the vulnerability of victims of trafficking and the lack of protection for them in the UK. This is why the UK Government must sign up to the European Convention which guarantees protection for victims of trafficking."

The UK has no guaranteed protection for trafficked people, and has not signed the Council of Europe’s European Convention on Action Against Trafficking in Human Beings.

Currently, trafficked people are not guaranteed any protection in the UK, exposing them to inappropriate treatment by the authorities as well as re-trafficking.

The European Convention guarantees a trafficked person at least 30 days to remain in the country to receive support, including emergency medical assistance, safe housing and legal advice.

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