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Children's rights who use wheelchairs are often cut off from their friends and family and told that they must sit on their own in designated accessible seats. Seating arrangements for disabled people often fail to allow space for others to join them.

Disabled kids are left out of the shared excitement of heckling and shouting the familiar cries of Îbehind you Î and Îoh no you wonÌtÌ during old favourites like Cinderella and Jack and The Beanstalk. Stalls with more room for groups are sometimes accessible but these are often only available at top prices.

A Scope straw poll has shown many families have faced these problems in large and small venues alike. Chris Meadows, mother of 12 year old Tinisha who is severely disabled was told last year by Alexandra Palace that it was fully accessible only to hear when they arrived that her daughter would have to sit seperately from family and friends.

Anastasia Tuli is nine and has had similar experiences. 'I had to sit on my own at Holiday on Ice,' she said.

AnastasiaÃŒs mother Rosh said:

'ItÃŒs so unfair as it is something that kids want to do together. They donÃŒt want to end up sitting next to strangers. When there are areas where the family can sit as a group it will usually be in the most expensive seats. A trip to a show can end up costing an enormous amount and must stop a lot of families with disabled Children's rights going.'

Jane Enticott, ScopeÃŒs Campaigns Manager said:

'This is a common problem for wheelchair users. Theatres need to look at access in a more inclusive way. We would also encourage more disability awareness amongst staff in theatres and booking offices. ItÃŒs a familiar example of disabled people getting a raw deal as consumers.'

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