Syria: Child detainee dies in military hospital

The family of Syrian 16-year-old Ahmed Ismael al-'Akkad were told in early August 2013 that he had died in a military hospital.

We have appealed to the Syrian authorities on numerous occasions, voicing concerns about the detention and treatment of  Ahmed Ismael al-'Akkad.  Amnesty International has been monitoring the situation and despite numerous appeals, the child has sadly died in a military hospital.

Ahmed Ismael al-'Akkad had been held incommunicado since 20 November 2012, when he was arrested during raids by government forces on his neighbourhood, al-Midan, in the capital, Damascus. His family were unaware of his whereabouts until 40 days later when they received a note from Ahmed Ismael al-'Akkad.  The note which was apparently smuggled out of a prison in Damascus by released detainees, indicated that the child was being held at the Palestine branch, a Damascus detention centre run by Military Intelligence.

According to a local contact, on 12 June 2013 the child was referred to a juvenile criminal court in Damascus.  The referral was made by an investigating judge from the Anti-Terrorism Court and the child was expected to appear within two days.  However he did not appear in court and contacts believed that he could have been held at the Military Intelligence branch in the Damascus suburb of Qaboun, though his whereabouts remained unconfirmed.  Ahmed Ismael al-'Akkad is believed to have been transferred to a military hospital around mid-June, for reasons unknown.

The same local contact told Amnesty International that Ahmed Ismael al-'Akkad's relatives were asked by Military Intelligence officers to pick up his personal items around early August, and were then informed that he had died in the military hospital.

Amnesty International has so far been unable to obtain further information about Ahmed Ismael al-'Akkad's death or the reasons for his initial hospitalization but will continue to follow this case.

No further action is requested. Many thanks to all who sent appeals.

 

 

 

 

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