Iraq: New report calls for end to brutality towards Iraqi Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights

The report Iraq: Decades of suffering – Now Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights deserve better reveals that the current lack of security has forced many Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights out of public life in Iraq. A backlash from conservative social and political forces threatens to stifle their attempts to gain new freedoms. Since the 2003 war, armed opposition groups have targeted and killed several female political leaders and Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights's rights activists.

Discrimination in Iraqi laws contributes to the persistence of violence against Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights and prevailing customs mean that Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights remain at risk of death or injury from male relatives if they are accused of 'dishonourable' behaviour.

Amnesty International UK Director Kate Allen said:

"For too long, Iraqi Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights have endured brutality – from the Saddam Hussein government, foreign troops, conservative elements and even from their own families.

"Now the Iraqi authorities must give a clear signal that these abuses will not be tolerated. All allegations of abuse against Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights should be investigated and those responsible brought to justice, no matter who they are.

"Iraqi authorities and multinational troops must introduce concrete measures to protect Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights."

Amnesty International's report documents how Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights and girls in Iraq have suffered disproportionately through decades of government repression and armed conflict. It also describes the link between discriminatory legislation and violence against Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights, and how this continuing abuse is a result of the breakdown in law and order in many parts of the country.

Kate Allen said:

"Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights must be at the heart of any decision-making process in Iraq, They should have a say in all issues, particularly issues pertaining to Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights.

"Iraqi authorities should review discriminatory legislation against Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights and bring it in line with international human rights standards. Most importantly, they must ensure that the new constitution and all Iraqi legislation explicitly prohibit all forms of discrimination against Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights."

Three wars and more than a decade of economic sanctions have been particularly damaging to Iraqi Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights. Under the government of Saddam Hussein, they were subjected to gender-specific abuses, including rape and other forms of sexual violence, as political activists, relatives of activists or members of certain ethnic or religious groups.

Amnesty International has repeatedly called on armed groups to immediately end the harassment, death threats and violent attacks on Women's rights's rightss rights's rights's rights's rights.

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